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Shane J. Nho, M.D, M.S.
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Health Care News

  • When Can I Return to Play After an Orthopedic Sports Injury?

    Recovery is as unique to the individual as is their genetic makeup – it really does depend on a wide variety of factors. However, for many common orthopedic injuries, there's usually a fairly consistent timeline for return to sport or active living.

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  • Study shows cycling as number one cause of cervical fractures in men

    Sporting-related cervical fractures increased by 35 percent from 2000 to 2015, mainly due to an increase in cycling-related injuries, according to research presented at the 2018 Annual Meeting of the American Academy of Orthopaedic Surgeons (AAOS).

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  • Health Tip: Signs You Need Rotator Cuff Surgery

    THE rotator cuff is a collection of tendons and muscles that surround the shoulder. It's common for athletes -- for example, baseball pitchers -- to injure this area.

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  • Delayed rotator cuff repair yielded superior functional outcomes vs immediate repair

    Despite improvements in clinical outcomes and a low incidence of retears among patients who underwent either immediate or delayed surgical repair of a partial-thickness rotator cuff tear, results published in the American Journal of Sports Medicine showed delayed surgery yielded superior functional outcomes at 6 months postoperatively.

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  • Study shows men and women tear ACL the same way in non-contact injury

    While women are two to four times more likely than men to tear the anterior cruciate ligament (ACL) in their knee, the cause of this injury is no different between the sexes, according to new research.

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  • Lifelong physical activity increases bone density in men

    Men have many reasons to add high-impact and resistance training to their exercise regimens; these reasons include building muscle and shedding fat. Now a researcher has determined another significant benefit to these activities: building bone mass. The study found that individuals who continuously participated in high-impact activities, such as jogging and tennis, during adolescence and young adulthood, had greater hip and lumbar spine bone mineral density than those who did not.

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  • Hip dysplasia: When is surgery required?

    Hip dysplasia is a condition in which the top portion of the thigh bone doesn't fit properly in the socket portion of the hip joint — either because it is out of place or it is not the correct shape. In many cases, this condition is present at birth. Some people may not be diagnosed during childhood, however, and only when symptoms appear later is the problem identified. Although some adults with hip dysplasia need surgery to correct the problem, total hip replacement isn’t always necessary.

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  • Care of Shoulder Pain in the Overhead Athlete

    Shoulder complaints are common in the overhead athlete. Understanding the biomechanics of throwing and swimming requires understanding the importance of maintaining the glenohumeral relationship of the shoulder.

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  • Improvements in ACL surgery may help prevent knee osteoarthritis

    Injury to the anterior cruciate ligament (ACL) in the knee frequently leads to early-onset osteoarthritis, a painful condition that can occur even if the patient has undergone ACL reconstruction to prevent its onset. A new review looks at the ability of two different reconstruction techniques to restore normal knee motion and potentially slow degenerative changes.

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  • Martial arts can be hazardous to kids

    Perhaps there's a black belt in your child's future. But for safety's sake, kids should only engage in noncontact forms of martial arts, a new American Academy of Pediatrics report says.

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